Research Article  |   February 2015
Factors That Moderate Activity Limitation and Participation Restriction in People With Multiple Sclerosis
Author Affiliations
  • Yael Goverover, PhD, is Associate Professor, New York University, New York, NY, and Visiting Scientist, Kessler Foundation, West Orange, NJ; yg243@nyu.edu
  • Lauren Strober, PhD, is Senior Research Scientist, Neuropsychology and Neuroscience Laboratory, Kessler Foundation, West Orange, NJ
  • Nancy Chiaravalloti, PhD, is Director, Neuropsychology and Neuroscience Laboratory and Traumatic Brain Injury Laboratory, Kessler Foundation, West Orange, NJ
  • John DeLuca, PhD, is Senior Vice President for Research, Kessler Foundation, West Orange, NJ
Article Information
Multiple Sclerosis / Neurologic Conditions / Occupation, Participation, and Health
Research Article   |   February 2015
Factors That Moderate Activity Limitation and Participation Restriction in People With Multiple Sclerosis
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 2015, Vol. 69, 6902260020p1-6902260020p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.014332
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, February 2015, Vol. 69, 6902260020p1-6902260020p9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2015.014332
Abstract

We examined the variables most associated with activity limitation (i.e., cooking) and participation restriction (i.e., employment) in 72 people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Participants underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery assessing memory, executive functions, visual perception, and processing speed and completed questionnaires assessing activity, participation, fatigue, and affective symptoms. Results showed that processing speed was the only variable consistently significantly related to both activity and participation. When examining specific aspects of activity and participation in isolation, employment status was significantly associated with education level, visual memory, fatigue, and processing speed. Cooking ability was associated with performance on tasks of working memory, verbal memory, and processing speed. These findings suggest that processing speed is a primary cognitive factor in MS influencing quality of both activity and participation in everyday life.