Research Article  |   September 2013
DVD Training for Depression Identification and Treatment in Older Adults: A Two-Group, Randomized, Wait-List Control Study
Author Affiliations
  • Cathy Lysack, PhD, OT(C), is Deputy Director and Professor of Occupational Therapy, Institute of Gerontology, Wayne State University, Room 231, Knapp Building, 87 East Ferry Street, Detroit, MI 48202; c.lysack@wayne.edu
  • Carrie Leach, MPA, is Manager, Community Based Research and Engagement, Institute of Gerontology, Wayne State University, Detroit
  • Theresa Russo is Education Program Coordinator, Alzheimer’s Association–Greater Michigan Chapter, Southfield
  • Daniel Paulson, MA, is Doctoral Candidate, Department of Psychology, Wayne State University, Detroit, and Clinical Psychology Intern, Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Charleston, SC
  • Peter A. Lichtenberg, PhD, ABPP, is Director, Institute of Gerontology, and Professor of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, Wayne State University, Detroit
Article Information
Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Education of OTs and OTAs / Mental Health / Professional Issues
Research Article   |   September 2013
DVD Training for Depression Identification and Treatment in Older Adults: A Two-Group, Randomized, Wait-List Control Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2013, Vol. 67, 584-593. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.008060
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2013, Vol. 67, 584-593. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.008060
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To test the effectiveness of an educational intervention aimed at improving mental health knowledge and skills in occupational therapists working with older rehabilitation patients.

METHOD. The DVD-format educational intervention was evaluated using a two-group randomized wait-list control design. Occupational therapists (n = 75) completed a 32-item knowledge questionnaire at three time points. Patient charts were reviewed (n = 960) at 3 months before and 3 and 6 months after DVD training to evaluate clinical practice change.

RESULTS. A two-way analysis of variance showed knowledge scores increased significantly for both groups after DVD training. A significant Group × Time interaction and significant main effects for time and group were found. Chart review data also showed significant increases in desired clinical behaviors in both groups after training. The greatest single item of clinical practice change was use of a standardized depression screen.

CONCLUSION. DVD-based training can significantly improve mental health practice.