Research Article  |   May 2012
Effect of Occupation- and Activity-Based Interventions on Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Performance Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Systematic Review
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elsa Orellano, PhD, OTR/L, ATP, is Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy Program, School of Health Professions, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, PO Box 365067, San Juan, PR 00936-5067; elsa.orellano@upr.edu; and Assistive Technology Consultant, Puerto Rico Assistive Technology Program, Filus Institute, Central Administration, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan
  • Wanda I. Colón, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor and Director, Occupational Therapy Program, School of Health Professions, Medical Sciences Campus, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan
  • Marian Arbesman, PhD, OTR/L, is Consultant, AOTA Evidence-Based Practice Project; President, ArbesIdeas, Inc.; and Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Science, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Williamsville
  • Copyright © 2012 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
Article Information
Complementary/Alternative Approaches / Evidence-Based Practice / Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Vision / Special Issue on the Relationship Between Occupation and Productive Aging
Research Article   |   May 2012
Effect of Occupation- and Activity-Based Interventions on Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Performance Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A Systematic Review
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2012, Vol. 66, 292-300. doi:10.5014/ajot.2012.003053
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2012, Vol. 66, 292-300. doi:10.5014/ajot.2012.003053
Abstract

This systematic review examines the effectiveness of occupation- and activity-based interventions on community-dwelling older adults’ performance of instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). It was conducted as part of the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Evidence-Based Practice Project. Forty studies met the inclusion criteria and were critically appraised and synthesized. Within occupation-based and client-centered interventions, the evidence that multicomponent interventions improve and maintain IADL performance in community-dwelling older adults is strong. The results also indicate that client-centered, occupation-based interventions can be effective in improving and maintaining IADL performance. The evidence is moderate for functional task exercise programs and limited for simulated IADL interventions to improve IADL performance. In the area of performance skills, the evidence related to physical activity and cognitive skills training is mixed, and the evidence that vision rehabilitation interventions improve IADL performance in older adults with low vision is moderate. Implications for practice, education, and research are also discussed.