Research Article  |   September 2012
Efficacy of the Get Ready to Learn Yoga Program Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Pretest–Posttest Control Group Design
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristie Patten Koenig, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, New York University, 35 West 4th Street, New York, NY 10012; kpk3@nyu.edu
  • Anne Buckley-Reen, OTR/L, RYT, is President, For Kids OT, PC, Fort Tilden, NY
  • Satvika Garg, MS, OTR/L, is Research Assistant, Department of Occupational Therapy, New York University, New York
  • Copyright © 2012 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
Article Information
Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Complementary/Alternative Approaches / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / School-Based Practice / Intervention Effectiveness
Research Article   |   September 2012
Efficacy of the Get Ready to Learn Yoga Program Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Pretest–Posttest Control Group Design
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2012, Vol. 66, 538-546. doi:10.5014/ajot.2012.004390
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2012, Vol. 66, 538-546. doi:10.5014/ajot.2012.004390
Abstract

Occupational therapists use school-based yoga programs, but these interventions typically lack manualization and evidence from well-designed studies. Using an experimental pretest–posttest control group design, we examined the effectiveness of the Get Ready to Learn (GRTL) classroom yoga program among children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The intervention group received the manualized yoga program daily for 16 wk, and the control group engaged in their standard morning routine. We assessed challenging behaviors with standardized measures and behavior coding before and after intervention. We completed a between-groups analysis of variance to assess differences in gain scores on the dependent variables. Students in the GRTL program showed significant decreases (p < .05) in teacher ratings of maladaptive behavior, as measured with the Aberrant Behavior Checklist, compared with the control participants. This study demonstrates that use of daily classroomwide yoga interventions has a significant impact on key classroom behaviors among children with ASD.