Research Article  |   January 2013
Effectiveness of Occupational Performance Coaching in Improving Children’s and Mothers’ Performance and Mothers’ Self-Competence
Author Affiliations
  • Fiona Graham, PhD, is Lecturer, Rehabilitation Teaching and Research Unit, University of Otago, PO Box 4345, Christchurch 8140 New Zealand; fi.graham@otago.ac.nz
  • Sylvia Rodger, PhD, MEdSt, is Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland St. Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Jenny Ziviani, PhD, MEd, is Professor, Children’s Allied Health Research, Queensland Health, and School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland St. Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Ethics / Evidence-Based Practice / Health and Wellness / Intellectual Disabilities / Mental Health / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   January 2013
Effectiveness of Occupational Performance Coaching in Improving Children’s and Mothers’ Performance and Mothers’ Self-Competence
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2013, Vol. 67, 10-18. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.004648
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2013, Vol. 67, 10-18. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.004648
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study examined the effectiveness of occupational performance coaching in improving children’s and mothers’ occupational performance and mothers’ parenting self-competence.

METHOD. A one-group time-series design was used to evaluate changes in children’s (n = 29) and mothers’ (n = 8) occupational performance at four time points: (1) pre–wait list, (2) preintervention, (3) postintervention, and (4) follow-up.

RESULTS. Significant improvements in occupational performance occurred postintervention for children, F(1, 78) = 153.72, p < .001, η2 = .86, and mothers, F(1, 78) = 153.72, p < .001, η2 = .86, that were maintained 6 wk after intervention. Mothers’ self-competence in parenting also improved, F(1, 72) = 17.36, p < .001, η2 = .42.

CONCLUSION. Findings provide preliminary evidence supporting the effectiveness of occupational performance coaching in improving children’s and mothers’ occupational performance and mothers’ parenting self-competence. Improvements were sustained and appeared to generalize to other areas of performance.