Research Article  |   January 2013
Determinants of Change in Stroke-Specific Quality of Life After Distributed Constraint-Induced Therapy
Author Affiliations
  • Yan-Hua Huang, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Human Services, College of Professional Studies, California State University, Dominguez Hills
  • Ching-Yi Wu, ScD, OTR, is Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy and Graduate Institute of Behavioral Science, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
  • Keh-Chung Lin, ScD, OTR, is Professor and Chair, School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, 17, F4, Xu Zhou Road, Taipei, Taiwan 100, and Director, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei; kehchunglin@ntu.edu.tw
  • Yu-Wei Hsieh, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy and Graduate Institute of Behavioral Science, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
  • Wilaiwan M. Snow, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy and Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand
  • Tien-Ni Wang, PhD, is Assistant Professor, School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   January 2013
Determinants of Change in Stroke-Specific Quality of Life After Distributed Constraint-Induced Therapy
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2013, Vol. 67, 54-63. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.004820
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2013, Vol. 67, 54-63. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.004820
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We identified the predictive factors of change in quality of life (QOL) after a distributed form of constraint-induced therapy (dCIT) among stroke survivors.

METHOD. Seventy-four participants were treated with dCIT. We identified eight potential determinants of change: age, gender, side of lesion, time since stroke, cognitive status, motor impairment of the upper extremity, activities of daily living (ADLs), and instrumental ADLs (IADLs). The Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS–QOL) was used to assess QOL.

RESULTS. Right-sided lesion and onset >17 mo earlier determined greater improvement in the SS–QOL Energy domain. Onset >10 mo earlier, poorer IADL performance, and age >68 yr predicted improvement in the Family Role, Mobility, and Mood domains, respectively.

CONCLUSION. Side of lesion, time since stroke, IADL performance, and age were the most important determinants of QOL in patients receiving stroke motor rehabilitation.