Research Article  |   January 2013
Importance of Tissue Morphology Relative to Patient Reports of Symptoms and Functional Limitations Resulting From Median Nerve Pathology
Author Affiliations
  • Shawn C. Roll, PhD, OTR/L, CWCE, is Assistant Professor, Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, 1540 Alcazar Street, CHP 133, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9003; sroll@usc.edu. At the time of the study, he was Doctoral Candidate, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Kevin D. Evans, PhD, RT(R)(M)(BD), RDMS, RVS, FSDMS, is Associate Professor and Chair, Radiologic Sciences and Respiratory Therapy, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Xiaobai Li, PhD, is Biostatistical Scientist, Center for Biostatistics, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Carolyn M. Sommerich, PhD, is Associate Professor, Department of Integrated Systems Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Jane Case-Smith, EdD, is Professor and Chair, Occupational Therapy Division, The Ohio State University, Columbus
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Musculoskeletal Impairments / Work and Industry / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   January 2013
Importance of Tissue Morphology Relative to Patient Reports of Symptoms and Functional Limitations Resulting From Median Nerve Pathology
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2013, Vol. 67, 64-72. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.005785
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2013, Vol. 67, 64-72. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.005785
Abstract

Significant data exist for the personal, environmental, and occupational risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome. Few data, however, explain the interrelationship of tissue morphology to these factors among patients with clinical presentation of median nerve pathology. Therefore, our primary objective was to examine the relationship of various risk factors that may be predictive of subjective reports of symptoms or functional deficits accounting for median nerve morphology. Using diagnostic ultrasonography, we observed real-time median nerve morphology among 88 participants with varying reports of symptoms or functional limitations resulting from median nerve pathology. Body mass index, educational level, and nerve morphology were the primary predictive factors. Monitoring median nerve morphology with ultrasonography may provide valuable information for clinicians treating patients with symptoms of median nerve pathology. Sonographic measurements may be a useful clinical tool for improving treatment planning and provision, documenting patient status, or measuring clinical outcomes of prevention and rehabilitation interventions.