Editorial  |   January 2013
Quantifying Function: The Rest of the Measurement Story
Author Affiliations
  • Barbara M. Doucet, PhD, OTR is Assistant Professor, University of Texas Medical Branch, Division of Rehabilitation Sciences, School of Health Professions, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX 77555-1137; bmdoucet@utmb.edu
  • Sharon A. Gutman, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Columbia University, Programs in Occupational Therapy, New York
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Health and Wellness / Neurologic Conditions / Professional Issues / Stroke / From the Desk of the Editor and Associate Editor
Editorial   |   January 2013
Quantifying Function: The Rest of the Measurement Story
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2013, Vol. 67, 7-9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.007096
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2013, Vol. 67, 7-9. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.007096
In this era of health care reform, funding caps, and restricted access to services, occupational therapy practitioners are challenged to validate their services and justify their place in the health care arena. The strength of our profession lies in our unique ability to thoroughly and comprehensively measure function—a person’s ability to perform a specific daily life activity such as transferring from a wheelchair to a toilet or maintaining a monthly budget that supports shared apartment living. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (World Health Organization, 2001) defines function in terms of body impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. Although occupational therapy practitioners have always agreed that evaluating and treating function is the essential core of the profession, we have not consistently agreed on the definition of function or the best methods to measure it.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large