Brief Report  |   January 2013
Development and Reliability of the Autism Work Skills Questionnaire (AWSQ)
Author Affiliations
  • Eynat Gal, PhD, OTR, is Director, Developmental Disabilities Department, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa 31905 Israel; eynatgal@gmail.com
  • Anat Ben Meir, MSc, OTR, is Occupational Therapy Supervisor, Education Department, Ariel, Israel, and Graduate, School of Occupational Therapy, Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Israel
  • Noomi Katz, PhD, OTR, is Director, Research Institute for Health and Medical Professions, Ono Academic College, Kiryat Ono, Israel
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Departments
Brief Report   |   January 2013
Development and Reliability of the Autism Work Skills Questionnaire (AWSQ)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2013, Vol. 67, e1-e5. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.005066
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2013, Vol. 67, e1-e5. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.005066
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The Autism Work Skills Questionnaire (AWSQ), a new, comprehensive self-report assessment of a person’s vocational profile, was developed to help produce a good person–job match. This preliminary study was aimed at developing the questionnaire and determining its content validity and internal consistency.

METHOD. Forty-six adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD), ages 18–39, were interviewed with the questionnaire. A two-phase study was conducted: (1) constructing the questionnaire and determining its content validity and (2) ascertaining internal consistency reliability.

RESULTS. We found that the AWSQ had initial content validity and moderate to high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s α = .64–.90).

CONCLUSION. The AWSQ can be a useful clinical and research tool in occupational therapy for evaluating work skills of adults with HFASD. Further studies with larger samples and including both typically developing individuals and individuals with HFASD are required to further support the questionnaire’s reliability and validity.