Research Article  |   March 2013
Children’s Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment/Preference for Activities of Children: Psychometric Properties in a Population With High-Functioning Autism
Author Affiliations
  • Marie-Christine Potvin, PhD, OTR, is Research Assistant Professor, Center on Disability and Community Inclusion, University of Vermont, Mann Hall, Third Floor, 208 Colchester Avenue, Burlington, VT 05405-1757; mpotvin@uvm.edu
  • Laurie Snider, PhD, OTR, is Associate Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec
  • Patricia Prelock, PhD, CCC-SLP, is Professor and Dean, College of Nursing and Health Sciences, University of Vermont, Burlington
  • Eva Kehayia, PhD, is Associate Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec
  • Sharon Wood-Dauphinee, PhD, PT, is Professor, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Autism/Autism Spectrum Disorder / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   March 2013
Children’s Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment/Preference for Activities of Children: Psychometric Properties in a Population With High-Functioning Autism
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2013, Vol. 67, 209-217. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.006288
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2013, Vol. 67, 209-217. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.006288
Abstract

The psychometric properties of assessments must be established for specific populations. The psychometric properties of the Children’s Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment/Preference for Activities of Children have been studied only in a sample of children with physical disability. We conducted a study to determine the appropriateness of drawing inferences from this assessment for children with high-functioning autism (HFA). The content validity and test–retest reliability (r > .7) were both found to be adequate for this population. Parents’ agreement with most of their children’s self-ratings on this assessment provided an estimate of interrater reliability. We also ascertained the feasibility of gathering recreational participation information from children with HFA and found that adaptations to facilitate the self-completion of the tool should be made available. The study findings support the use of this tool to assess recreational participation among children with HFA.