Research Article  |   May 2013
Occupational Therapy Interventions to Improve Performance of Daily Activities at Home for Older Adults With Low Vision: A Systematic Review
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Chiung-Ju Liu, PhD, OTR, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Indiana University at Indianapolis, 1140 West Michigan Street, CF 303, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5199; liu41@iu.edu
  • Melodie A. Brost, MS, OTR; Vanessa E. Horton, MS, OTR; Sarah B. Kenyon, MS, OTR; and Kristen E. Mears, MS, OTR, were Graduate Students, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Indiana University at Indianapolis, at the time of the review
  • Copyright © 2013 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Vision / Special Issue on Effectiveness of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Older Adults With Low Vision
Research Article   |   May 2013
Occupational Therapy Interventions to Improve Performance of Daily Activities at Home for Older Adults With Low Vision: A Systematic Review
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2013, Vol. 67, 279-287. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.005512
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2013, Vol. 67, 279-287. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.005512
Abstract

The impact of age-related vision loss on older adults’ independence at home is profound. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the effectiveness of interventions within the scope of occupational therapy practice to maintain, restore, and improve performance in daily activities at home for older adults with low vision. We searched and screened abstracts from multiple electronic databases and identified 17 studies that fulfilled our inclusion and exclusion criteria. Three themes in intervention approaches emerged: multicomponent intervention, single-component intervention, and multidisciplinary intervention. Strong evidence of effectiveness was found in studies that applied a multicomponent approach; these interventions involved teaching knowledge and skills that older adults with low vision need to help overcome the disablement process. Evidence also suggests that multiple sessions of training with low vision devices and special viewing skills to compensate for vision loss are necessary to have a positive effect on daily activities. Finally, multidisciplinary intervention that focused on personal goals yielded greater positive outcomes than interventions that were not personalized.