Research Article  |   May 2013
Norm Scores of the Box and Block Test for Children Ages 3–10 Years
Author Affiliations
  • Marjolein Jongbloed-Pereboom, MSc, is PhD Student, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9104, Nijmegen 6500 HE, the Netherlands; M.Jongbloed-Pereboom@pwo.ru.nl
  • Maria W. G. Nijhuis-van der Sanden, PhD, is Full Professor in Allied Health Sciences, Pediatric Physical Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation, Scientific Institute for Quality of Healthcare, Nijmegen Medical Centre, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Bert Steenbergen, PhD, is Full Professor of Perception and Action Problems, Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / School-Based Practice / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   May 2013
Norm Scores of the Box and Block Test for Children Ages 3–10 Years
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2013, Vol. 67, 312-318. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.006643
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2013, Vol. 67, 312-318. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.006643
Abstract

This study provides new norm scores for the Box and Block Test for gross manual dexterity in children ages 3–10 yr. Two hundred fifteen Dutch children performed the Box and Block Test separately with each hand. We found an age effect for the scores; older children obtained higher scores than younger children. Concurrent validity was assessed by means of comparison with the manual dexterity subtests of the Movement Assessment Battery for Children–2; correlations were significant. Intraclass correlation coefficients for test–retest and interrater reliability measures were .85 and .99, respectively. The Box and Block Test is an easy, feasible, valid, and reliable measurement for gross manual dexterity in young children. The obtained norms can be used in clinical settings to compare the gross manual dexterity of atypically developing children with that of age-related peers and to evaluate efficacy of interventions. A larger international reference population is needed to increase generalizability.