Research Article  |   May 2013
Systematic Reviews Informing Occupational Therapy
Author Affiliations
  • Sally Bennett, PhD, is Senior Lecturer, University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy, St. Lucia, Queensland 4072 Australia; sally.bennett@uq.edu.au
  • Tammy Hoffmann, PhD, is Associate Professor, Centre for Research in Evidence-Based Practice, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Robina, Queensland, Australia
  • Annie McCluskey, PhD, MA, DipCOT, is Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, Cumberland Campus, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Nicole Coghlan is Honours Student, University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Division of Occupational Therapy, St. Lucia, Queensland, Australia
  • Leigh Tooth, PhD, is Senior Research Fellow, University of Queensland, School of Population Health, Herston, Queensland, Australia
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues / Professional Issues
Research Article   |   May 2013
Systematic Reviews Informing Occupational Therapy
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2013, Vol. 67, 345-354. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.005819
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2013, Vol. 67, 345-354. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.005819
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We sought to identify and describe the number, topics, and publishing trends of systematic reviews relevant to occupational therapy indexed in the OTseeker database.

METHOD. We performed a cross-sectional survey of the systematic reviews contained in OTseeker in December 2011.

RESULTS. Of the 1,940 systematic reviews indexed in OTseeker, only 53 (2.7%) were published in occupational therapy journals. The most common diagnostic categories were stroke (n = 195, 10.1%) and affective disorders (n = 204, 10.5%). The most common intervention categories were consumer education (n = 644, 33.2%) and psychosocial techniques (n = 571, 29.4%). Only 390 (20.1%) of the 1,940 systematic reviews specifically involved occupational therapy.

CONCLUSION. Occupational therapists need to search broadly to locate relevant systematic reviews or, alternatively, to use databases such as OTseeker. Clarity about the involvement of occupational therapy in reports of future research will improve the ability to identify occupational therapy research for all stakeholders. Finally, occupational therapy practitioners need to read systematic reviews critically to determine whether review conclusions are justified.