Research Article  |   July 2013
Evidence for the Effectiveness of Different Service Delivery Models in Early Intervention Services
Author Affiliations
  • Karrie Kingsley, OTD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy, Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1540 Alcazar Street, CHP-133, Los Angeles, CA 90081; klkingsl@osot.usc.edu
  • Zoe Mailloux, OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Program Development Consultant, Private Practice, Redondo Beach, CA
Article Information
Early Intervention / Special Issue on Occupational Therapy and Early Intervention/Early Childhood
Research Article   |   July 2013
Evidence for the Effectiveness of Different Service Delivery Models in Early Intervention Services
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2013, Vol. 67, 431-436. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.006171
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July 2013, Vol. 67, 431-436. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.006171
Abstract

Consideration of the evidence for all aspects of service delivery is a growing relevant concern of occupational therapists, including those providing early intervention to children and families. We conducted a review of the literature to uncover what evidence existed for determining the effectiveness of different service delivery models and methods used to improve occupational performance for children and families who receive early intervention services. Through a comprehensive search, we reviewed and synthesized studies, finding common themes of family-centered and routine-based approaches, service setting, and the inclusion of parent participation and training. Families consistently reported positive perceptions of family-centered and routine-based approaches. Parent participation and training resulted in positive outcomes. No specific setting or method of service delivery was identified as clearly most effective, with most studies reporting combined approaches and environments for interventions.