Brief Report  |   July 2013
Self-Reported Versus Objectively Assessed Exercise Adherence
Author Affiliations
  • Hon K. Yuen, PhD, OTR/L, is Professor and Director of Research, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 Third Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294; yuen@uab.edu
  • Ed Wang, PhD, is Professor, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Katy Holthaus is Research Coordinator, Department of Health Sciences and Research, College of Health Professions, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
  • Laura K. Vogtle, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor and Director, Postprofessional Master’s Program, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Health Professions, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • David Sword, PT, DPT, CCS, is Associate Professor, Division of Physical Therapy, College of Health Professions, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
  • Hazel L. Breland, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, College of Health Professions, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
  • Diane L. Kamen, MD, MSCR, is Associate Professor, Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston
Article Information
Complementary/Alternative Approaches / Departments
Brief Report   |   July 2013
Self-Reported Versus Objectively Assessed Exercise Adherence
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2013, Vol. 67, 484-489. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.007575
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2013, Vol. 67, 484-489. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.007575
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We examined agreement of data between self-reported and objectively assessed exercise adherence among women with systemic lupus erythematosus.

METHOD. Eleven participants completed weekly exercise logs on date and duration of exercise during a 10-wk Wii Fit™ home-based program. Afterward, exercise data from the log were compared with those recorded in the Wii console.

RESULTS. Of the paired data, the mean duration of exercise recorded in the Wii was 29.5 min and that recorded in the log was 33.3 min. The composite intraclass correlation for exercise duration between exercise log and the Wii Fit was 0.4. The 95% limits of agreement indicated large between-subjects variability.

CONCLUSION. Exercise logs exhibit a marginally acceptable agreement with Wii estimation of exercise duration at a group level. However, caution should be applied when using the exercise log as a measure of a person’s exercise behavior because of the tendency to overreport.