Brief Report  |   January 2011
Computer-Based Rhythm and Timing Training in Severe, Stroke-Induced Arm Hemiparesis
Author Affiliations
  • Sarah C. Beckelhimer, MSOT; Ann E. Dalton, MSOT; and Charissa A. Richter, MSOT, were Students, Occupational Therapy Program, Xavier University, Cincinnati OH, at the time of the study
  • Valerie Hermann, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapy Research Assistant, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cincinnati Academic Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH. She is also a member of the Neuromotor Recovery and Rehabilitation Laboratory, Drake Rehabilitation Center, Cincinnati, OH
  • Stephen J. Page, PhD, is Associate Professor, Departments of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Sciences, Neurology, and Neurosciences, and Member, Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Stroke Team, all at the University of Cincinnati Academic Medical Center, 3202 Eden Avenue, Suite 315, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0394; Stephen.Page@uc.edu. Dr. Page is also a student in the Occupational Therapy Program at the University of Findlay, Findlay, OH
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Departments / Brief Report
Brief Report   |   January 2011
Computer-Based Rhythm and Timing Training in Severe, Stroke-Induced Arm Hemiparesis
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2011, Vol. 65, 96-100. doi:10.5014/ajot.2011.09158
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January/February 2011, Vol. 65, 96-100. doi:10.5014/ajot.2011.09158
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We pilot tested the efficacy of computer-based training implementing rhythm and timing in chronic, severe, stroke-induced hemiparesis.

METHOD. Two chronic stroke patients were administered the upper-extremity section of the Fugl-Meyer Impairment Scale (FM), the Arm Motor Ability Test (AMAT), Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM). We then administered the computer-based intervention for 60 min, 3 days/wk for 4 wk. One week after intervention, we administered the FM, AMAT, COPM, and SIS.

RESULTS. After intervention, participants exhibited reduced arm impairment (indicated by FM scores of +2.0 and +4.0) and increases in average functional ability (+0.85 and +1.1 points on the AMAT), perceived quality of life (+2.0 and +32.0 points on the SIS), and perception of overall recovery (+10.0 points for each participant on the SIS).

CONCLUSION. This study provides preliminary evidence suggesting efficacy of computer-based rhythm and timing in chronic stroke.