Research Article  |   July 2010
In-Home Occupational Performance Evaluation (I–HOPE)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan L. Stark, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy and Neurology, Program in Occupational Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8505, St. Louis, MO 63108; starks@wustl.edu
  • Emily K. Somerville, MS, OTR/L, is Research Coordinator, Program in Occupational Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • John C. Morris, MD, is Harvey A. and Dorismae Hacker Friedman Professor of Neurology; Professor, Pathology and Immunology Director, Center for Aging; Director, Memory and Aging Project; and Director, Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • Copyright © 2010 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.
Article Information
Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Home Accessibility/Environmental Modification / Productive Aging
Research Article   |   July 2010
In-Home Occupational Performance Evaluation (I–HOPE)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2010, Vol. 64, 580-589. doi:10.5014/ajot.2010.08065
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2010, Vol. 64, 580-589. doi:10.5014/ajot.2010.08065
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We describe the development and preliminary psychometric properties of an assessment to quantify the magnitude of an environmental barrier’s influence on occupational performance.

METHOD. The assessment was developed and then piloted on a group of 77 older adults before and after an occupational therapy intervention focused on environmental barrier removal. Refinements were made to the assessment before it was evaluated for interrater reliability in a sample of 10 older adults using 2 raters.

RESULTS. The In-Home Occupational Performance Evaluation (I–HOPE) is a performance-based measure that evaluates 44 activities in the home. The 4 subscales of Activity Participation, Client’s Rating of Performance, Client’s Satisfaction With Performance, and Severity of Environmental Barriers are sensitive to change in the environment. The subscales’ internal consistency from .77 to .85, and intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from .99 to 1.0.

CONCLUSION. This preliminary study suggests that the I–HOPE is a psychometrically sound instrument that can be used to examine person–environment fit in the home.