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Research Article  |   March 1997
Jewish Spirituality Through Actions in Time: Daily Occupations of Young Orthodox Jewish Couples in Los Angeles
Author Affiliations
  • Gelya Frank, PhD, is Associate Professor, Departments of Occupational Therapy and Anthropology, University of Southern California, 1540 Alcazar Street, CHP-133, Los Angeles, California 90033
  • Carol Sue Bernardo, MEd, is Master’s Student in Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • Shonna Tropper is Master’s Student in Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • Frank Noguchi is Master’s Student in Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • Carey Lipman is Master’s Student in Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • Beth Maulhardt is Master’s Student in Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
  • Laura Weitze is Master’s Student in Occupational Therapy University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Article Information
Research
Research Article   |   March 1997
Jewish Spirituality Through Actions in Time: Daily Occupations of Young Orthodox Jewish Couples in Los Angeles
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 1997, Vol. 51, 199-206. doi:10.5014/ajot.51.3.199
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March 1997, Vol. 51, 199-206. doi:10.5014/ajot.51.3.199
Abstract

Ethnographic methods were used to study daily occupations and weekly routines of four young Orthodox Jewish couples living in Los Angeles. Data from interviews and participant observation demonstrate the importance to the couples of fulfilling God’s commandments [Hebrew, mitzvot], which organize and sanctify the otherwise mundane activities of daily living, such as eating, bathing, sleeping, and rising. The article focuses on the couples’ experiences in (a) observing the Sabbath, (b) studying and praying, and (c) keeping a kosher home. Orthodox Jewish ritual, practice, and spirituality are time bound and action oriented. Occupational therapists can benefit from understanding how Orthodox Jews invest and experience spiritual meaning in seemingly mundane occupations and routines.