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Research Article  |   April 1997
A Consecutive Series of Adults With Brain Injury Treated With a Washing and Dressing Retraining Program
Author Affiliations
  • Gordon Muir Giles, MA, Dip COT, OTR, is Director of Clinical Services, The Neurobehavioral Program at Highview, 1301 East 31st Street, Oakland, California 94602, and Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy, Samuel Merritt College, Oakland, California. At the time of this study, he was Clinical Director, Transitions of Berkeley, Berkeley, California
  • Jonathan Edward Ridley, is Polysomnographic Technologist, Stanford Sleep Disorders Center, Stanford, California. At the time of this study, he was Rehabilitation Assistant, The Neurobehavioral Program at Highview, Oakland, California
  • Ann Dill, MEd, CCC/SLP, is Director of Speech–Language Pathology, Guardian Health Group, Inc., Corte Madera, California. At the time of this study, she was Assistant Clinical Director, Transitions of Berkeley, Berkeley, California
  • Susan Frye, MS, OTR, is Occupational Therapist in Home Care Settings, Therapy Resources, Inc., Sonoma, California. At the time of this study, she was Occupational Therapist, Transitions of Berkeley, Berkeley, California
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Research
Research Article   |   April 1997
A Consecutive Series of Adults With Brain Injury Treated With a Washing and Dressing Retraining Program
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1997, Vol. 51, 256-266. doi:10.5014/ajot.51.4.256
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1997, Vol. 51, 256-266. doi:10.5014/ajot.51.4.256
Abstract

Objectives. Single-case reports indicate that behavioral methods can assist persons with brain injury to redevelop self-care skills. However, the proportion of patients who could benefit from these interventions is unknown. The present study used a specific retraining protocol to treat all patients admitted to a single facility over a 3-year period who were unable to wash and dress independently.

Method. Four patients out of 48 met the study criteria and were treated with the washing and dressing protocol. Three had traumatic brain injury, and one had brain injury after cerebral bleed. The training program involved behavioral observation, task analysis, consistent practice, and cue fading. The Adaptive Behavior Scale was used to measure behavior change.

Results. Three subjects achieved rapid independence in washing and dressing (20 days, 37 days, and 11 days of treatment), and one did not show significant clinical improvement.

Conclusion. All patients admitted to the facility during a 3-year period who required washing and dressing retraining were treated with the same protocol. The consecutive series design prevented researchers from selecting patients who they believed were good treatment candidates; therefore, the findings support the general applicability of the training program.