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Research Article  |   April 1997
Therapists’ Perceptions of Pediatric Occupational Therapy Interventions in Self-Care
Author Affiliations
  • Stacy Koser Swart, MS, OTR/L, was Student, Master of Science Degree Program, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, at the time of this study
  • Elizabeth M. Kanny, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Lecturer and Head, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Box 356490, Seattle, Washington 98195
  • Teresa L. Massagli, MD, is Assistant Professor, Departments of Rehabilitation Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, and is Physiatrist, Rehabilitation Medicine, Children’s Hospital and Medical Center, Seattle, Washington
  • Joyce M. Engel, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Assistant Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Research
Research Article   |   April 1997
Therapists’ Perceptions of Pediatric Occupational Therapy Interventions in Self-Care
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1997, Vol. 51, 289-296. doi:10.5014/ajot.51.4.289
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1997, Vol. 51, 289-296. doi:10.5014/ajot.51.4.289
Abstract

Objectives. This study examined the congruence between pediatric occupational therapists’ self-care interventions and occupational therapy’s philosophical base, which focuses on performance of self-care skills as primary in evaluation and intervention.

Method. A questionnaire was mailed to 252 therapists serving children ages birth to 6 years. The questionnaire asked for therapists’ perceptions about the importance, uniqueness, and frequency of 10 areas of intervention, including self-care.

Results. Perceived importance of self-care was found to be strongly related to perceived frequency of self-care intervention. Practice setting was significantly associated with perceptions of uniqueness of self-care, and team membership status was significantly associated with importance of self-care. Most respondents perceived self-care intervention to be important (86%) and unique (80%) to occupational therapy. Seventy percent regularly provided intervention for self-care.

Conclusions. The therapists’ perceptions reflected continued regard for self-care as an important and unique area of pediatric occupational therapy but were somewhat discrepant with the actual frequency of self-care interventions.