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Research Article  |   May 1997
The Mechanisms for Adult-Onset Apraxia and Developmental Dyspraxia: An Examination and Comparison of Error Patterns
Author Affiliations
  • Janet L. Poole, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy Program, University of New Mexico, Health Sciences and Services Building, Room 215, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-5641
  • Jere Gallagher, PhD, is Associate Professor, Department of Health, Physical, and Recreation Education, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Janine Janosky, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Division of Bio-statistics, Department of Family and Clinical Epidemiology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Clifford Qualls, PhD, is Professor of Statistics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico
Article Information
Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Learning Disabilities / Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Traumatic Brain Injury / Original Articles
Research Article   |   May 1997
The Mechanisms for Adult-Onset Apraxia and Developmental Dyspraxia: An Examination and Comparison of Error Patterns
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 1997, Vol. 51, 339-346. doi:10.5014/ajot.51.5.339
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May 1997, Vol. 51, 339-346. doi:10.5014/ajot.51.5.339
Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine whether persons with developmental dyspraxia and apraxia make similar errors during the performance of four types of tasks.

Method. Three groups of subjects with dyspraxia or apraxia (i.e., children with learning disabilities and dyspraxia, young adults with learning disabilities and dyspraxia, older adults with left-hemisphere brain damage with apraxia) and three groups of age-matched control subjects (i.e., children, young adults, older adults) were observed performing transitive, intransitive, verbal command and imitation tasks. Performance was scored on the basis of the types of errors made. Errors were classified as conceptual (nonrelated, unrecognizable, sequencing) or production (omission, perseveration, related, internal configuration, external configuration, incorrect movement, body part as object).

Results. No significant difference was found between conceptual and production error patterns for any group. In addition, there was no significant difference between the dyspraxia and apraxia groups or among the control groups on the specific types of production errors made. However, the dyspraxia and apraxia groups differed in the type of conceptual error made on the intransitive task. The body-part-as-object error was the most frequently made error on the transitive, verbal command, and imitation tasks, whereas the movement error was the most frequently made error on the intransitive task.

Conclusion. Subjects with dyspraxia or apraxia make similar errors, suggesting that the praxis behaviors are similar.