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Research Article  |   November 1997
The Interest Checklist: A Factor Analysis
Author Affiliations
  • James P. Klyczek, PhD, OTR, is Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy and Interim Dean, School of Health and Human Services, D’Youville College, 320 Porter Avenue, Buffalo, New York 14201
  • Nancy Bauer-Yox, MS, OTR, is Consulting Occupational Therapist, Consolidated Rehabilitation Services, Williamsville, New York
  • Roger C. Fiedler, PhD, is Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, D’Youville College, Buffalo, New York
Article Information
Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Research
Research Article   |   November 1997
The Interest Checklist: A Factor Analysis
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 1997, Vol. 51, 815-823. doi:10.5014/ajot.51.10.815
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 1997, Vol. 51, 815-823. doi:10.5014/ajot.51.10.815
Abstract

Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the 80 items on the Interest Checklist empirically cluster into the five categories of interests described by Matsutsuyu, the developer of the tool.

Method. The Interest Checklist was administered to 367 subjects classified in three subgroups: students, working adults, and retired elderly persons. An 80-item correlation matrix was formed from the responses to the Interest Checklist for each subgroup and then used in factor analysis model to identify the underlying structure or domains of interest.

Results. Results indicated that the Social Recreation theoretical category was empirically independent for all three subgroups; the Physical Sports and Cultural/Educational theoretical categories were empirically independent for only the college students and working adults; and the Manual Skills theoretical category was empirically independent for only the working adults.

Conclusion. Although therapists should continue to be cautious in their interpretation of patients’ Interest Checklist scores, the tool is useful for identifying patients’ interests in order to choose meaningful activities for therapy.