Research Article  |   September 2013
Observed Recovery Sequence in Neurobehavioral Function After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
Author Affiliations
  • Natasha A. Lannin, PhD, is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, Alfred Health, 99 Commercial Road, Prahran, 3181, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; and Honorary Research Fellow, Rehabilitation Studies Unit, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Ryde, New South Wales, Australia; N.Lannin@latrobe.edu.au
  • Anne Cusick, PhD, is Professor and Head of School of Health Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
  • Robyn McLachlan was Honors Graduate, Faculty of Health Science, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia, at the time of the study
  • Jeanine Allaous is Senior Occupational Therapist, Royal Rehabilitation Centre Sydney, Ryde, New South Wales, Australia
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   September 2013
Observed Recovery Sequence in Neurobehavioral Function After Severe Traumatic Brain Injury
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2013, Vol. 67, 543-549. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.008094
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2013, Vol. 67, 543-549. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.008094
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The Western Neuro Sensory Stimulation Profile (WNSSP) presents a hierarchy of items suggestive of a sequence of recovery. The aim of this study was to understand the sequence of recovery of neurobehavioral function in patients with brain injury and determine whether this sequence was consistent with the WNSSP test item order.

METHOD. We conducted a retrospective clinical chart audit of 37 adult inpatients (mean age = 29 yr; 31 men, 6 women) with a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury and a minimum of two medical record entries on the WNSSP. The sequence of recovery was statistically derived from the content and structure of the WNSSP.

RESULTS. Our analysis did not support the current item ordering of the WNSSP as a function of the sequence of recovery from coma, with the exception of the Arousal/Attention subscale.

CONCLUSION. WNSSP item performance suggested a sequence of recovery; clinicians may consider a revised item order that reflects this observed order.