Brief Report  |   September 2013
Occupational Therapy Based on Ayres Sensory Integration in the Treatment of Retentive Fecal Incontinence in a 3-Year-Old Boy
Author Affiliations
  • Isabelle Beaudry Bellefeuille, BScOT, OT(C), is Private Practitioner, Marqués de Santa Cruz, 7, 1°E 33007 Oviedo, Spain; ibbergo@gmail.com
  • Roseann C. Schaaf, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor and Vice Chairman, Department of Occupational Therapy, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia
  • Eduardo Ramos Polo, MMed, is Pediatric Gastroenterologist, private practice, Oviedo, Spain
Article Information
Sensory Integration and Processing / Departments
Brief Report   |   September 2013
Occupational Therapy Based on Ayres Sensory Integration in the Treatment of Retentive Fecal Incontinence in a 3-Year-Old Boy
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2013, Vol. 67, 601-606. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.008086
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2013, Vol. 67, 601-606. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.008086
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We present the case report of a 3-yr-old boy with retentive fecal incontinence and sensory overresponsivity. Sensory integration theory was used to address the overresponsivity affecting the child’s ability to acquire age-appropriate toileting habits. We describe the 7 mo of treatment and 3 mo of follow-up in occupational therapy.

METHOD. We analyzed a retrospective chart review of daily defecation log outcome data and parent interview.

RESULTS. Notable improvements in acquiring age-appropriate toileting habits were documented and measured using daily defecation logs. Improvements in sensory processing were documented using the Sensory Profile and corroborated improvements in the child’s ability to participate in toileting routines and parent report of improved quality of life.

CONCLUSION. Occupational therapy using Ayres Sensory Integration® was a useful framework for addressing this child’s toileting habits. This case explicates occupational therapy using data-driven intervention principles to address the relationship among sensory processing, behavior, and occupational performance.