Editorial  |   November 2013
A Fork in the Road: An Occupational Hazard?
Author Affiliations
  • Glen Gillen, EdD, OTR, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Programs in Occupational Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine, Columbia University, 710 West 168th Street, 8th Floor, New York, NY 10032; GG50@Columbia.edu
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Professional Issues / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / 2013 Eleanor Clarke Slagle Lecture
Editorial   |   November 2013
A Fork in the Road: An Occupational Hazard?
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 2013, Vol. 67, 641-652. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.676002
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 2013, Vol. 67, 641-652. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.676002
Good evening and welcome! I am thrilled to be at this podium and just as thrilled to be resuming my life an hour from now! This honor has been overwhelming in a good way, as you can imagine and, also as you can imagine, stressful. I have to thank my colleagues at Columbia University for consistently reminding me over the past year that this is an honor, not a punishment. In all seriousness, however, I am particularly touched to be delivering this lecture in San Diego. The last time I was in this city was the day after I completed my mental health fieldwork about 5 miles from where we are now. That was about 25 years ago, and it was the final hurdle to completing my bachelor’s degree in occupational therapy at New York University. The occupational therapists who worked in the unit that I trained on that summer firmly embraced and applied Mary Reilly’s occupational behavior frame of reference. I feel lucky that I was thoroughly trained in her approach and had the chance to read her 1961 Slagle lecture (Reilly, 1962) multiple times that summer.
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