Research Article  |   November 2013
Perceived Participation After Stroke: The Influence of Activity Retention, Reintegration, and Perceived Recovery
Author Affiliations
  • Gunilla Eriksson, PhD, OT reg, is Assistant Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Research and Development Officer, Department of Speech Pathology, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, University Hospital, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden; and Researcher and Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Disability and Habilitation, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden
  • M. Carolyn Baum, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor, Occupational Therapy and Neurology, and Elias Michael Director, Program in Occupational Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • Timothy J. Wolf, OTD, MSCI, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Program in Occupational Therapy and Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
  • Lisa Tabor Connor, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Program in Occupational Therapy and Departments of Neurology and Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, Campus Box 8505, St. Louis, MO 63108; lconnor@wustl.edu
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Stroke / Occupation, Participation, and Health
Research Article   |   November 2013
Perceived Participation After Stroke: The Influence of Activity Retention, Reintegration, and Perceived Recovery
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 2013, Vol. 67, e131-e138. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.008292
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 2013, Vol. 67, e131-e138. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.008292
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We sought to determine the extent to which perceptions of participation in everyday occupations were affected in a sample of people with predominantly mild stroke. Demographic variables, stroke severity, community integration, participation in everyday occupations, and perceptions of recovery were examined as potential contributors to their perceptions of participation.

METHOD. We conducted a cross-sectional study with 116 people with mild to moderate first stroke assessed approximately 6 mo after stroke.

RESULTS. Perceptions of participation assessed using the Stroke Impact Scale varied (range = 19–100), with a mean score of 82. Regression analyses revealed three factors that contributed to perceptions of participation: retention of previous activities, reintegration in home and community, and perception of stroke recovery.

CONCLUSION. Although the majority of participants reported a high level of perceived participation, more than a third failed to report successful participation.