Research Article  |   November 2013
Broadening the Occupational Therapy Toolkit: An Executive Functioning Lens for Occupational Therapy With Children and Youth
Author Affiliations
  • Heidi Cramm, PhD, OT Reg (Ont), is Assistant Professor, School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen’s University, Louise D. Acton Building, 31 George Street, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 Canada; heidi.cramm@queensu.ca
  • Terry Krupa, PhD, OT Reg (Ont), FCAOT, is Professor, School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON
  • Cheryl Missiuna, PhD, OT Reg (Ont), is Professor, School of Rehabilitation Science, and Director, CanChild, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON
  • Rosemary M. Lysaght, PhD, OT Reg (Ont), is Associate Professor, Occupational Therapy Program, School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON
  • Kevin C. H. Parker, PhD, C Psych, is Director, Psychology Clinic at Queen’s, and Adjunct Associate Professor, Psychology and Psychiatry, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON
Article Information
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder / Multidisciplinary Practice / Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / School-Based Practice / Professional Issues
Research Article   |   November 2013
Broadening the Occupational Therapy Toolkit: An Executive Functioning Lens for Occupational Therapy With Children and Youth
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 2013, Vol. 67, e139-e147. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.008607
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 2013, Vol. 67, e139-e147. doi:10.5014/ajot.2013.008607
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. Attention to executive functioning (EF) and its effect on occupational performance is increasing in the occupational therapy literature. This study explored occupational therapists’ perceptions of how EF is recognized and addressed within occupational therapy for children and youth.

METHOD. Inductive qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the in-depth interview data from 13 occupational therapists with a range of practice contexts and experience.

RESULTS. EF should be explicitly considered during clinical reasoning. System and professional barriers create challenges to occupational therapists, constraining their ability to recognize, label, and address EF performance issues. Occupational therapists who have integrated EF into their practice perspective have acquired knowledge and skills through interprofessional collaborations, client interactions, and professional development opportunities.

CONCLUSION. Occupational therapists working with children and youth need an occupational EF framework and practice resources if they are to integrate an EF lens to more broadly enable occupational performance.