Research Article  |   March 2014
Effects of Weighted Vests on Attention, Impulse Control, and On-Task Behavior in Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Author Affiliations
  • Hung-Yu Lin, PhD, OTR, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
  • Posen Lee, PhD, OTR, is Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, I-Shou University, No. 8 Yida Road, Jiau-Shu Village, Yanchao District, Kaohsiung City 824, Taiwan; posenlee@isu.edu.tw
  • Wen-Dien Chang, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Department of Sports Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
  • Fu-Yuan Hong, PhD, is Associate Professor, Center for General Education, Taipei College of Maritime Technology, Taipei, Taiwan
Article Information
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / School-Based Practice / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   March 2014
Effects of Weighted Vests on Attention, Impulse Control, and On-Task Behavior in Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2014, Vol. 68, 149-158. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.009365
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2014, Vol. 68, 149-158. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.009365
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of using weighted vests for improving attention, impulse control, and on-task behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

METHOD. In a randomized, two-period crossover design, 110 children with ADHD were measured using the Conners’ Continuous Performance Test–II (CPT–II) task.

RESULTS. In the weighted vest condition, the participants did show significant improvement in all three attentional variables of the CPT–II task, including inattention; speed of processing and responding; consistency of executive management; and three of four on-task behaviors, including off task, out of seat, and fidgets. No significant improvements in impulse control and automatic vocalizations were found.

CONCLUSION. Although wearing a weighted vest is not a cure-all strategy, our findings support the use of the weighted vest to remedy attentional and on-task behavioral problems of children with ADHD.