In Brief  |   March 2014
The Professional Occupational Therapy Doctoral Degree: Why Do It?
Author Affiliations
  • Jane Case-Smith, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210; Jane.case-smith@osumc.edu
  • Stephen J. Page, PhD, OTR/L, FAHA, is Associate Professor; Amy Darragh, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Assistant Professor; Melinda Rybski, PhD, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor; and Dennis Cleary, OTD, MS, OTR/L, is Assistant Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / Health and Wellness / Education of OTs and OTAs / Multidisciplinary Practice / Departments / The Issue Is …
In Brief   |   March 2014
The Professional Occupational Therapy Doctoral Degree: Why Do It?
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2014, Vol. 68, e55-e60. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.008805
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2014, Vol. 68, e55-e60. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.008805
Abstract

This article presents a rationale for the development of professional occupational therapy doctorate (OTD) programs. As more universities transition to the entry-level OTD degree, opportunities are becoming available to advance the profession and increase benefits to clients. We analyzed the current health care environment and developed the following proposed outcomes for doctoral-trained practitioners: (1) Demonstrate advanced clinical skills; (2) attain proficiency in outcomes measurement and analysis and synthesis of outcomes data; (3) routinely use standardized evidence-based practice clinical guidelines that translate research into practice; (4) develop, implement, and lead health promotion services; and (5) excel as partners in interprofessional teams.