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Research Article  |   September 1996
Teaching Strategies for the Development of Clinical Reasoning
Author Affiliations
  • Maureen E. Neistadt, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Assistant Professor, Occupational Therapy Department, University of New Hampshire, Hewitt Hall, 4 Library Way, Durham, New Hampshire 03824-3563
Article Information
Education of OTs and OTAs / Education
Research Article   |   September 1996
Teaching Strategies for the Development of Clinical Reasoning
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 1996, Vol. 50, 676-684. doi:10.5014/ajot.50.8.676
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September 1996, Vol. 50, 676-684. doi:10.5014/ajot.50.8.676
Abstract

A primary aim of occupational therapy education is to teach students how to think like practitioners, that is, how to engage in clinical reasoning. Since the early 1980s, occupational therapy clinical reasoning research has elucidated a language that describes the various types of thinking therapists use in clinical practice, a language that has the potential to make previously tacit thought processes accessible to conscious examination and improvement. Occupational therapy educators can use that language to make their teaching of clinical reasoning more explicit to students. The article examines occupational therapy teaching methods using the language of clinical reasoning, categorizing them by the types of clinical reasoning they promote. Current clinical reasoning language is reviewed, and teaching strategies to facilitate the various types of clinical reasoning are described.