Free
Research Article  |   January 1998
Occupation and Survival: A 25-Year Follow-Up Study of an Aging Population
Author Affiliations
  • Susanne Iwarsson, OT, PhD, is Research Associate and Assistant Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences, Lund University, and Department of Occupational Therapy, University College of Health Sciences, Helgeandsgatan 16, S-223 54 Lund, Sweden
  • Ǻke Isacsson, PhD, is Associate Professor and Deputy Head, Department of Community Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
  • Dennis Persson, OT, is Assistant Professor and Doctoral Candidate, Department of Community Health Sciences, Lund University, and Department of Occupational Therapy, University College of Health Sciences, Lund, Sweden
  • Bengt Scherstén, MD, PhD, is Professor Em., Department of Community Health Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Article Information
Geriatrics/Productive Aging / Special Issue on Community Health / Carolyn Baum, Mary Law, Guest Editors
Research Article   |   January 1998
Occupation and Survival: A 25-Year Follow-Up Study of an Aging Population
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 1998, Vol. 52, 65-70. doi:10.5014/ajot.52.1.65
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, January 1998, Vol. 52, 65-70. doi:10.5014/ajot.52.1.65
Abstract

Objective. In this retrospective study of an elderly population cohort living in a defined Swedish rural area, the relationship between occupation and survival as a measure of objective health was investigated. The cohort has been followed for 25 years.

Method. On the basis of the baseline socioeconomic interview from assessments performed when the participants were 67 years of age, an index of active participation in daily occupation was devised. The index was used to investigate the covariation between generic everyday occupation and long-time survival.

Results. For the female participants, Kaplan-Meier curves demonstrated differences in survival between the “less active” and “more active, ” and Cox regression survival analyses resulted in a significant covariance between occupation and survival. For the male participants, no such differences were found.

Conclusion. The significant results for the women implied support for the core assumption of occupational therapy that a relationship exists between occupation and health. The lack of differences in survival among more active and less active men demonstrates the complexity of studying occupation.