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Research Article  |   March 2009
Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile and Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder
Author Affiliations
  • Eric F. Rieke, MS, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist in Behavioral Health, Regions Hospital, St. Paul, MN; riek0014@umn.edu
  • Diane Anderson, MPH, OTR/L, is Department Chair and Assistant Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN
Article Information
Mental Health / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Mental Health
Research Article   |   March 2009
Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile and Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2009, Vol. 63, 138-145. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.2.138
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2009, Vol. 63, 138-145. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.2.138
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We sought to describe how the sensory processing of adults with obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) differs from that of the general population within the context of Dunn's (1997) model of sensory processing and to evaluate the discriminant validity of the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP).

METHOD. Using unequal variance t tests, the AASP results of 51 adults with OCD were compared with the means of the AASP standardization study's adult age group.

RESULTS. Adults with OCD scored higher than the means of the AASP standardization study's adult age group on sensory sensitivity and sensation avoiding, consistent with predictions based on the OCD literature. Adults with OCD also scored higher on low registration and lower on sensation seeking.

CONCLUSIONS. The results provide a preliminary description of how the sensory processing of adults with OCD differs from that of the general population and preliminary support for the AASP's discriminant validity.