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Research Article  |   March 2009
Occupation of Motherhood: Challenges for Mothers With Scleroderma
Author Affiliations
  • Janet L. Poole, PhD, OTR/L, is Professor, Occupational Therapy Graduate Program, School of Medicine, University of New Mexico, MSC09 5240, Albuquerque, NM 87131–0001; jpoole@salud.unm.edu
  • Kelly Willer, MOT, OTR/L, is Occupational Therapist, HealthSouth, Albuquerque, NM
  • Cindy Mendelson, PhD, RN, is Associate Professor, College of Nursing, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
Article Information
Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Departments / Brief Report
Research Article   |   March 2009
Occupation of Motherhood: Challenges for Mothers With Scleroderma
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2009, Vol. 63, 214-219. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.2.214
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2009, Vol. 63, 214-219. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.2.214
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We sought to identify which aspects of motherhood are difficult for mothers who have scleroderma along with variables associated with mothering.

METHOD. Participants were 75 mothers with scleroderma with a child between birth and 18 years old living with them. They completed the Parent Disability Index (PDI); a demographic questionnaire; and measures of pain, fatigue, and activity limitations.

RESULTS. Mothers with children ages 5 or younger reported that getting up and down from the floor to play with their children was the most difficult task, and mothers with children between 6 and 18 years old reported that playing with their children outdoors, doing household chores, and shopping were the most difficult tasks. Significant correlations were found between PDI and pain, fatigue, and activity limitations.

CONCLUSIONS. Mothers with scleroderma have difficulty with aspects of motherhood. The findings that pain, fatigue, and activity limitations were related to mothering suggest areas for occupational therapy intervention.