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Research Article  |   May 2009
Supported Education for Adults With Psychiatric Disabilities: Effectiveness of an Occupational Therapy Program
Author Affiliations
  • Sharon A. Gutman, PhD, OTR/L, is Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy, Programs in Occupational Therapy, Columbia University, 710 West 168th Street, NI–8, New York, NY 10032; sg2422@columbia.edu
  • Robin Kerner, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, and Director, Quality Initiatives and Outcomes, Department of Psychiatry, St. Luke's–Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York
  • Irene Zombek, MS, OTR/L, is Director of Psychiatric Rehabilitation, St. Luke's–Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York
  • Jennifer Dulek, OTR/L, is Staff Occupational Therapist, St. Luke's–Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York
  • C. Andrew Ramsey, MD, is Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, and Audubon Clinic, New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York
Article Information
Mental Health / Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Mental Health
Research Article   |   May 2009
Supported Education for Adults With Psychiatric Disabilities: Effectiveness of an Occupational Therapy Program
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2009, Vol. 63, 245-254. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.3.245
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2009, Vol. 63, 245-254. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.3.245
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study assessed the effectiveness of a supported education program for adults with psychiatric disabilities.

METHOD. Thirty-eight adults with psychiatric disabilities were randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 21) that received supported education services or to a control group (n = 17) that received treatment as usual.

RESULTS. We found a statistically significant difference between experimental and control group participant scores on the five instruments used to measure the program's effectiveness. Sixteen of the 21 experimental group participants (76%) completed the program. At 6-month follow-up, 10 (63%) had enrolled in an educational program, had obtained employment, or were applying to a specific program. Only 1 of the control group participants was enrolled in an educational program.

CONCLUSION. The results support the effectiveness of the supported education program. A significant number of participants were able to improve their basic academic skills, enhance professional behaviors and social skills, and return to the school or work environment.