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Research Article  |   May 2009
Conducting Systematic Reviews to Inform Occupational Therapy Practice
Author Affiliations
  • Susan L. Murphy, ScD, OTR,is Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Research Health Science Specialist, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Health Care System, 300 North Ingalls Street, Institute of Gerontology, 9th Floor, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2007; sumurphy@umich.edu
  • Jennifer C. Robinson, PhD, RN,was Research Fellow, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, at the time this article was submitted. She is now Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson
  • Susan H. Lin, ScD, OTR/L, was Assistant Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, Shenandoah University, Winchester, Virginia, at the time this article was submitted. She is now Director of Research, American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, MD
Article Information
Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues
Research Article   |   May 2009
Conducting Systematic Reviews to Inform Occupational Therapy Practice
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2009, Vol. 63, 363-368. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.3.363
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2009, Vol. 63, 363-368. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.3.363
Abstract

Systematic reviews (SRs) are increasingly used in the health professions to evaluate research evidence to guide practice and justify reimbursement for services. Despite the importance of SRs in the health professions, there is no definitive guide for how to conduct a useful, high-quality review. In this article we will (1) provide an overview of the process of writing a traditional SR with particular emphasis on design and conduct, (2) discuss limitations of the traditional SR in occupational therapy, and (3) describe how information is synthesized and used for clinical practice.