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Research Article  |   July 2009
Reliability of Two Visual–Perceptual Tests for Children With Cerebral Palsy
Author Affiliations
  • Li-ting Tsai, MS, is PhD Student, Taipei Parents’ Association for the Visually Impaired, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei
  • Keh-chung Lin, ScD, is Associate Professor and Chair, School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei
  • Hua-fang Liao, MS, is Associate Professor, School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei
  • Ching-lin Hsieh, PhD, is Professor, School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, 4F, No 17, Shiujou Road, Taipei 100, Taiwan; clhsieh@ntu.edu.tw
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   July 2009
Reliability of Two Visual–Perceptual Tests for Children With Cerebral Palsy
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2009, Vol. 63, 473-480. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.4.473
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2009, Vol. 63, 473-480. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.4.473
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We examined the reliability of the Motor-Free Visual Perception Test–Revised (MVPT–R) and the Test of Visual–Perceptual Skills–Revised (TVPS–R) in 52 children with cerebral palsy.

METHOD. The MVPT–R and TVPS–R were initially assessed by a single rater and then randomly assigned to the same rater or another rater after 6 to 14 days.

RESULTS. For scale-level reliability of both tests, the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were high. The smallest real differences (SRDs) were largely acceptable. The ICCs of most subscale-level reliability of the TVPS–R were satisfactory. The SRD of each TVPS–R subscale score was notable (>29%). The internal consistency was high for both tests.

CONCLUSION. The scale-level reliabilities of both tests were satisfactory in children with cerebral palsy. Although most subscales of the TVPS–R had acceptable test–retest or interrater agreement, all subscales of the TVPS–R had large SRDs, limiting their clinical utility.