Free
Research Article  |   April 1996
Alma: Coping With Culture, Poverty, and Disability
Author Affiliations
  • Erna Imperatore Blanche, MA, OTR, BCP, is Co-owner of a Los Angeles private practice pediatric clinic, 6382 Arizona Circle, Los Angeles, California 90045; Doctoral Student, Occupational Science Program, University of Southern California; and Adjunct Instructor, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California
Article Information
Rehabilitation, Participation, and Disability / Research
Research Article   |   April 1996
Alma: Coping With Culture, Poverty, and Disability
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1996, Vol. 50, 265-276. doi:10.5014/ajot.50.4.265
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, April 1996, Vol. 50, 265-276. doi:10.5014/ajot.50.4.265
Abstract

This article raises questions about the ways culture affects the nature of health care services. By examining the life story of Alma, a Central American woman who has a daughter with disabilities; her interactions with health care providers; and my own assumptions about cultural differences, I note the impact of cultural differences on coping and adaptation in Alma and in the health care system when working with poor, non-English–speaking clients.