Free
Research Article  |   March 2007
Development of an Assessment for Ideational Praxis
Author Affiliations
  • Teresa A. May-Benson, ScD, OTR/L, is Research Director, The SPIRAL Foundation, and Clinical Specialty Director, Occupational Therapy Associates—Watertown, P.C., 124 Watertown Street, Watertown, MA 02472; tmay-benson@alum.bu.edu. At the time of this study, she was Doctoral Student, Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston University, Boston
  • Sharon A. Cermak, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor of Occupational Therapy, Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Boston University, Boston
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Conceptualizing and Identifying Sensory Processing Issues
Research Article   |   March 2007
Development of an Assessment for Ideational Praxis
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2007, Vol. 61, 148-153. doi:10.5014/ajot.61.2.148
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2007, Vol. 61, 148-153. doi:10.5014/ajot.61.2.148
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study developed an assessment of ideational praxis, examined its psychometric properties, and analyzed age and gender trends in children who were typically developing.

METHOD. Part 1 developed items and scoring criteria of the Test of Ideational Praxis (TIP) and examined interrater reliability and internal consistency. Part 2 studied performance of 80 typically developing children between ages 5 and 8 years.

RESULTS. The TIP demonstrated acceptable interrater reliability (ICC = .85) and internal consistency (coefficient alpha = .74). Children who were typically developing demonstrated age and gender trends. Girls scored higher than boys, and older children scored higher than younger children.

CONCLUSION. The TIP is the first objective assessment for identification of ideational abilities and is a reliable assessment tool. Further research is needed to validate the construct of ideation and examine the TIP’s ability to discriminate between children with and without ideational difficulties.