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Research Article  |   March 2007
How Does Sensory Processing Dysfunction Affect Play?
Author Affiliations
  • Anita C. Bundy, ScD, OTR, FAOTA, is Chair, Occupation and Leisure Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, New South Wales, Australia 1825; a.bundy@fhs.usyd.edu.au
  • Sue Shia, MOT, OTR, is Staff Occupational Therapist, New Hope Care Center, Tracy, CA
  • Long Qi, MD, PhD, MOT, OTR, is Staff Occupational Therapist, Future Care Health and Management Corporation, Pasadena, MD
  • Lucy Jane Miller, PhD, OTR, FAOTA, is Associate Clinical Professor, Departments of Rehabilitation Medicine and Pediatrics, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center; Director, Sensory Therapies and Research (STAR) Center; and Director, KID Foundation, Greenwood Village, CO
Article Information
Sensory Integration and Processing / Conceptualizing and Identifying Sensory Processing Issues
Research Article   |   March 2007
How Does Sensory Processing Dysfunction Affect Play?
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2007, Vol. 61, 201-208. doi:10.5014/ajot.61.2.201
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, March/April 2007, Vol. 61, 201-208. doi:10.5014/ajot.61.2.201
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study investigated sensory processing dysfunction (SPD) and playfulness and the effect of intervention on playfulness.

METHOD. Twenty children with SPD and 20 children who were typically developing took the Short Sensory Profile (SSP) and Test of Playfulness (ToP). Children with SPD took the praxis tests from the Sensory Integration and Praxis Tests (SIPT) and received 20 intervention sessions. Correlations among measures and differences between mean scores of groups and pre-intervention and post-intervention were examined.

RESULTS. Group ToP scores differed significantly; ToP did not increase post-intervention. Correlations among ToP and SSP ranged from .36 to .72; ToP and SIPT, from −0.1 to −0.46.

CONCLUSION. Modulation affects playfulness. Although intervention was not effective, both groups had high scores initially, making the finding difficult to interpret.