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Research Article  |   July 2007
Bottle-Feeding Behaviors in Preterm Infants With and Without Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Author Affiliations
  • Tsu-Hsin Howe, PhD, OTR, is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taiwan. The author was affiliated with Mount Sinai Medical Center when the study was conducted
  • Ching-Fan Sheu, PhD, is Professor, Institute of Cognitive Science, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan
  • Ian R. Holzman, MD, is Professor of Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Newborn Medicine, Mount Sinai Medical Center, 1176 Fifth Avenue, Box 1508, Klingenstein Pavilion, 3rd Floor, New York, NY 100296574; ian.holzman@mssm.edu
Article Information
Cardiopulmonary Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   July 2007
Bottle-Feeding Behaviors in Preterm Infants With and Without Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2007, Vol. 61, 378-383. doi:10.5014/ajot.61.4.378
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2007, Vol. 61, 378-383. doi:10.5014/ajot.61.4.378
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study compared bottle-feeding behaviors in preterm infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) during the initial hospitalization.

METHOD. Individual sucking characteristics and feeding transitional rates were compared in 41 preterm infants (22 boys, 19 girls) with BPD and 99 infants (44 boys, 55 girls) without BPD. Observations of the first bottle feeding and observations of the last feeding before discharge were obtained from medical records of all infants retrospectively.

RESULTS. On discharge, infants with BPD, unlike those without BPD, continued to have an immature sucking pattern and required longer hospital stays to attain full oral feeding (p < .001). No differences were found between the BPD and non-BPD groups in time needed for feeding and use of oral support.

CONCLUSION. These results suggest that feeding transitional rate, rather than sucking pattern, may be a better discharge indicator for infants with BPD.