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Research Article  |   September 2007
Supported-Employment Program Processes and Outcomes: Experiences of People With Schizophrenia
Author Affiliations
  • K. W. David Liu, MSc, OT(C), OTR, is Occupational Therapist II, Department of Mental Health, Grey Nuns Community Hospital, Caritas Health Group, 1100 Youville Drive West, Edmonton, Alberta T6L 5X8 Canada; dliu@cha.ab.ca
  • Vivien Hollis, PhD, MSc, TDipCOT, OT(C), is Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Alberta, Edmonton
  • Sharon Warren, PhD, is Professor, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton
  • Deanna L. Williamson, PhD, is Associate Professor, Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta, Edmonton
Article Information
Mental Health / Work and Industry / Mental Health
Research Article   |   September 2007
Supported-Employment Program Processes and Outcomes: Experiences of People With Schizophrenia
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2007, Vol. 61, 543-554. doi:10.5014/ajot.61.5.543
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2007, Vol. 61, 543-554. doi:10.5014/ajot.61.5.543
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This qualitative study explored participants’ experiences of a supported-employment program. Understanding participants’ opinions of a supported-employment program may provide insights into what processes and outcomes are meaningful and important for participants and may enable an evaluation of such processes and outcomes for their congruence with occupational therapy practice.

METHOD. Supported-employment program participants with schizophrenia (N = 7) were recruited from an agency and interviewed individually with open-ended questions. Data were analyzed using a grounded-theory approach.

RESULTS. We developed a tentative grounded theory with three themes of supported-employment program outcomes: (a) removing barriers to job seeking, (b) improving psychological well-being, and (c) participating in work.

CONCLUSION. Supported-employment program participants can achieve meaningful personal outcomes even though they do not obtain competitive employment. These programs removed barriers to job seeking, but personal readiness and efforts in job seeking contributed most to obtaining employment.