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Research Article  |   September 2007
Pediatric Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in a Young Child With Minimal Active Arm Movement
Author Affiliations
  • Anne E. Dickerson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor and Chair, Department of Occupational Therapy, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4354; dickersona@ecu.edu
  • LeeAnn Eagle Brown, MS, OTR/L, was Occupational Therapist, Therapeutic Innovations, Greenville, North Carolina, and Graduate Student, East Carolina University, Greenville, at the time of this study. Mailing address: 225 Mallard Bay Road, Hampstead, NC 28443
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Splinting / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   September 2007
Pediatric Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy in a Young Child With Minimal Active Arm Movement
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2007, Vol. 61, 563-573. doi:10.5014/ajot.61.5.563
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2007, Vol. 61, 563-573. doi:10.5014/ajot.61.5.563
Abstract

This study describes a single-subject design (ABA with follow-up evaluation) that demonstrated the possible effective use of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in producing gains in movement and function for a 24-month-old child with chronic hemiparesis. The noninvolved upper extremity was placed in a removable splint for 21 consecutive days. The child was involved in intensive occupational therapy in the home environment. Daily measurements were completed on the use and quality of motion of the involved upper extremity for eight specific fine and gross motor activities. Change in performance and quality of movement were measured and significant at the p < .05 level with the calculation of the C statistic for the motor activities with gains maintained after completion of the treatment and postsplinting phases. The results of the study contribute to the body of evidence finding CIMT to be effective for increasing movement and function in children with hemiparesis.