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Research Article  |   May 2008
Measuring Activity Pacing in Women With Lower-Extremity Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study
Author Affiliations
  • Susan L. Murphy, ScD, OTR, is Research Assistant Professor, Division of Geriatric Medicine and Institute of Gerontology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Research Health Science Specialist, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Health Care System, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2007; sumurphy@umich.edu
  • Dylan M. Smith, PhD, is Research Health Science Specialist, VA Center for Practice Management and Outcomes Research, Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI, and Research Assistant Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor
  • Neil B. Alexander, MD, is Professor, Division of Geriatric Medicine and Institute of Gerontology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, and Director, Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Health Care System, Ann Arbor, MI
Article Information
Arthritis / Musculoskeletal Impairments / Productive Aging
Research Article   |   May 2008
Measuring Activity Pacing in Women With Lower-Extremity Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2008, Vol. 62, 329-334. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.3.329
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2008, Vol. 62, 329-334. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.3.329
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We examined how women with osteoarthritis naturally use activity pacing and how pacing relates to symptoms and physical activity within daily routines.

METHOD. Thirty women with knee or hip osteoarthritis (mean age = 63.8 ± 6.9) wore an actigraph accelerometer and repeatedly reported activity pacing, pain, and fatigue. Using the median split, symptom patterns were compared for low and high pacers. The relationship between activity pacing and physical activity was also examined.

RESULTS. Activity pacing was low (1.4 ± 0.9); pain and fatigue were mild (1.0 ± 0.7 and 1.1 ± 0.7, respectively). When compared with low pacers, high pacers had more severe, escalating symptoms. Activity pacing was related to lower physical activity (β = −28.14, SE = 6.24), t (586) = −4.51, p = .0001.

CONCLUSION. Pain, fatigue, and activity pacing use varied depending on average activity pacing level. High pacers may benefit from interventions to manage daily symptoms.