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Research Article  |   July 2008
Effects of Task Instructions and Target Location on Reaching Kinematics in People With and Without Cerebrovascular Accident: A Study of the Less-Affected Limb
Author Affiliations
  • Keh-chung Lin, ScD, OTR, is Associate Professor and Chair, School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, and Neurobiology and Cognitive Science Center, National Taiwan University, and Director, Division of Occupational Therapy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei
  • Ching-yi Wu, ScD, OTR, is Associate Professor, Department of Occupational Therapy and Graduate Institute of Clinical Behavioral Science, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-hwa 1st Road, Kwei-shan, Taoyuan, Taiwan 33302; cywu@mail.cgu.edu.tw
  • Kwan-hwa Lin, PT, PhD, is Professor, Department of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei
  • Chein-wei Chang, MD, is Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Stroke / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   July 2008
Effects of Task Instructions and Target Location on Reaching Kinematics in People With and Without Cerebrovascular Accident: A Study of the Less-Affected Limb
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2008, Vol. 62, 456-465. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.4.456
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, July/August 2008, Vol. 62, 456-465. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.4.456
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We investigated how verbal instructions and target location interacted to influence reaching movement of the less-affected limb in participants with and without unilateral cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs).

METHOD. Using a counterbalanced repeated-measures design, 26 people with CVA and 24 age-matched healthy people performed the reaching tasks under 4 conditions formed by the crossing of verbal instructions (speed and accuracy emphasis) and target locations (ipsilateral and contralateral to the performing hand).

RESULTS. In the control groups, speeded instructions and ipsilateral reaches elicited significantly more preprogrammed movements than did accuracy instruction and contralateral reaches, respectively. Similar patterns of performance in response to task constraints were found in the CVA groups except for movement initiation in the right CVA group.

CONCLUSION. Instruction and locations interacted to constrain reaching movements in both control and CVA groups. The combination of speeded instruction and ipsilateral reach may optimize movement performance of the less-affected limb in stroke patients.