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Research Article  |   September 2008
Factor Structure of the Four Motor-Free Scales of the Developmental Test of Visual Perception, 2nd Edition (DTVP–2)
Author Affiliations
  • Ted Brown, PhD, MSc, MPA, BScOT(Hons), OT(C), OTR, AccOT, is Senior Lecturer, Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Primary Health Care, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University–Peninsula Campus, Building G, 4th Floor, McMahons Road, Frankston, Victoria 3163 Australia; ted.brown@med.monash.edu.au
  • Sylvia Rodger, BOccThy, MEdSt, PhD, is Associate Professor and Head, Division of Occupational Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 Australia
  • Aileen Davis, PhD, MSc, BSc(PT), is Senior Scientist, Division of Outcomes and Population Health, Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital, Main Pavilion, 11th Floor, Room 322, 399 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2S8 Canada
Article Information
Children and Youth
Research Article   |   September 2008
Factor Structure of the Four Motor-Free Scales of the Developmental Test of Visual Perception, 2nd Edition (DTVP–2)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2008, Vol. 62, 502-513. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.5.502
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2008, Vol. 62, 502-513. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.5.502
Abstract

INTRODUCTION. Visual–perceptual skills of children are often assessed using the Developmental Test of Visual Perceptual Skills–2, 2nd Edition (DTVP–2).

PURPOSE. The factor structure of the four motor-free DTVP–2 subscales was examined.

METHOD. The scores from a sample of 356 healthy children (171 boys and 185 girls) ages 5 to 11 years were used to complete a principal components factor analysis of the 4 subscales.

RESULTS. The position-in-space subscale had items load on six factors. The figure ground subscale had items load on five factors. The visual closure scale and form constancy subscales both had four factors. When the four DTVP–2 subscales were combined to form one overall motor-free visual perceptual scale, the items loaded on 21 factors.

CONCLUSION. The DTVP–2 and its four motor-free subscales exhibited multidimensionality instead of the expected unidimensional visual–perceptual constructs.