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Research Article  |   November 2015
Teaching Chewing: A Structured Approach
Author Affiliations
  • Nicholas Eckman, MA, is Behavior Specialist, Community Services Group, Lancaster, PA
  • Keith E. Williams, PhD, is Director, Feeding Program, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 905 West Governor Road, Hershey, PA 17033; feedingprogram@hmc.psu.edu
  • Katherine Riegel, MA, is Feeding Therapist, Feeding Program, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA
Article Information
Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   November 2015
Teaching Chewing: A Structured Approach
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 2015, Vol. 62, 514-521. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.5.514
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November 2015, Vol. 62, 514-521. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.5.514
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. A structured intervention was used to teach chewing to two children with special needs. Neither child had a history of chewing or eating high-textured food.

METHOD. The intervention combined oral–motor and behavior components to teach chewing. A multiple baseline design was used to evaluate treatment effectiveness.

RESULTS. Both children improved their chewing skills while increasing the texture of foods eaten and the variety of foods eaten.

CONCLUSION. This structured intervention could be used to teach chewing to a range of children who did not acquire this skill during normal development.