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Research Article  |   September 2008
Relationship Between Performance-Based and Self-Reported Assessment of Hand Function
Author Affiliations
  • Celina R. Rallon, MA, OTR/L, CHT, ICLM, SIPT-C, is Occupational Therapy Specialist, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, NY
  • Christine C. Chen, ScD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Associate Professor, Programs in Occupational Therapy, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 710 West 168th St., 8th Floor, New York, NY 10032; ccc2114@columbia.edu
Article Information
Hand and Upper Extremity / Rehabilitation, Disability, and Participation
Research Article   |   September 2008
Relationship Between Performance-Based and Self-Reported Assessment of Hand Function
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2008, Vol. 62, 574-579. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.5.574
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, September/October 2008, Vol. 62, 574-579. doi:10.5014/ajot.62.5.574
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To examine the relationships between self-reported and performance-based hand function.

METHOD. Thirty participants with hand function limitations completed the Manual Ability Measure (MAM–36) and the Upper Extremity Performance Test for the Elderly (TEMPA). Participants were categorized into two groups: (1) Dominant Hand Affected and (2) Nondominant Hand Affected. Correlations between the two assessments were examined. The speed of task execution and TEMPA scores were compared between the two groups.

RESULTS. A significant correlation was found between the MAM–36 and TEMPA Total Functional Rating (ρ = 0.79, p < .05). Significant differences were found in the speed of execution of unilateral tasks and the Unilateral Functional Ratings between the two groups.

CONCLUSION. The MAM–36 is a promising assessment tool for measuring a client's perceived hand function. However, a performance-based assessment can supplement information about the quality and speed of hand-task performance.