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Research Article  |   November 2009
Sensory Processing Abilities of Children Who Have Sustained Traumatic Brain Injuries
Author Affiliations
  • Jane Galvin, MOT, is Senior Occupational Therapist, Victorian Paediatric Rehabilitation Service, Royal Children’s Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia; Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; and School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; jane.galvin@rch.org.au
  • Elspeth H. Froude, BAppSc (OT), is Lecturer, School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, and Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Christine Imms, PhD, is Senior Lecturer, School of Occupational Therapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; and Senior Occupational Therapist, Occupational Therapy Department, Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Article Information
Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Sensory Integration and Processing / Traumatic Brain Injury / Childhood and Youth
Research Article   |   November 2009
Sensory Processing Abilities of Children Who Have Sustained Traumatic Brain Injuries
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 2009, Vol. 63, 701-709. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.6.701
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, November/December 2009, Vol. 63, 701-709. doi:10.5014/ajot.63.6.701
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. This study describes the sensory processing abilities of children ages 3–10 who sustained a moderate or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

METHOD. We used a prospective, descriptive study design with convenience sampling of 20 children who were admitted to a pediatric neurosurgical unit. Caregivers provided information regarding their child’s sensory processing abilities using the Sensory Profile (Dunn, 1999). We also collected demographic information related to the mechanism and severity of injury. Data were analyzed descriptively, and summary statistics were used to describe the Sensory Profiles of the children in comparison to normative data.

RESULTS. Proportionally more children with TBI than children in the normative sample demonstrated behaviors outside of the typical range in all sections of the Sensory Profile except for oral sensory processing.

CONCLUSION. These findings strongly support the need to include evaluation of sensory processing in any clinical assessment of children who have sustained TBI.