Research Article  |   May 2014
Content and Construct Validity of Here’s How I Write (HHIW): A Child’s Self-Assessment and Goal Setting Tool
Author Affiliations
  • Sharon A. Cermak, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, is Professor of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Ostrow School of Dentistry, 1540 Alcazar Street, CHP 133, Los Angeles, CA 90089, and Professor of Pediatrics, University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles; sharon.cermak@gmail.com
  • Julie Bissell, OTD, OTR/L, ATP, is Clinical Instructor of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California, Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Ostrow School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, and Occupational Therapist, Anaheim City School District, Anaheim, CA
Article Information
Assessment Development and Testing / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / School-Based Practice / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   May 2014
Content and Construct Validity of Here’s How I Write (HHIW): A Child’s Self-Assessment and Goal Setting Tool
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2014, Vol. 68, 296-306. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.010637
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2014, Vol. 68, 296-306. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.010637
Abstract

OBJECTIVE. We examined content and construct validity of Here’s How I Write: A Child’s Self-Assessment and Goal Setting Tool, to assess children’s perception of their handwriting and set child-directed goals.

METHOD. In Study 1, a content validity study, 6 occupational therapists and 2 educators assessed the need for this type of measure and examined the proposed items. Thirty-four occupational therapists and educators then completed an online survey examining the items. Study 2, a construct validity study, compared the self-ratings of 20 children with poor handwriting and 20 children with good handwriting in Grades 2–5 with their teachers’ ratings.

RESULTS. Results supported test content and indicated freedom from culture and gender bias. The assessment discriminated between good and poor writers. The relationship between teacher and student ratings was significant, although teachers of poor writers rated the children lower than the children rated themselves.

CONCLUSION. These studies provide support for the tool’s validity.