Research Article  |   May 2014
Young Adults With Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Longitudinal Study
Author Affiliations
  • Miri Tal-Saban, MSc, is Doctoral Student and Director, Kesher Outreach Program, School of Occupational Therapy, Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel
  • Asher Ornoy, MD, is Professor of Anatomy, Embryology and Teratology, Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, and Department Head of Child Development and Rehabilitation, Israeli Ministry of Health, Jerusalem
  • Shula Parush, PhD, is School Chair and Director of Graduate Studies, School of Occupational Therapy of Hadassah and Hebrew University of Jerusalem, PO Box 24026, Mount Scopus, Jerusalem 91240 Israel; msshulap@pluto.huji.ac.il
Article Information
Health and Wellness / Mental Health / Neurologic Conditions / Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention / Children and Youth
Research Article   |   May 2014
Young Adults With Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Longitudinal Study
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2014, Vol. 68, 307-316. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.009563
American Journal of Occupational Therapy, May/June 2014, Vol. 68, 307-316. doi:10.5014/ajot.2014.009563
Abstract

We conducted a longitudinal study to assess the continuing influence of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) on quality of life and participation. Ninety-six participants (25 in the DCD group, 30 in the borderline group, and 41 in the control group) ages 22–29 yr who had been screened for DCD 3–4 yr previously completed the Participation in Every Day Activities of Life, the Life-Satisfaction Questionnaire, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL–BREF) instrument. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed a significant between-groups difference, F(7, 95) = 2.89, p = .001, η = 0.173, and post hoc analyses revealed that participants in the DCD and borderline groups scored lower overall on participation, quality of life, and life satisfaction. Linear regression found the Psychological Health domain of the WHOQOL–BREF to be a significant predictor of life satisfaction (B = 0.533; p = .001).